Funding Opportunities: Week of September 18th

It’s time for the second installment of my funding series. I have found quite a few opportunities this week, particularly for doctoral students and those seeking short-term research fellowships.

Research Grants
Princeton Library Research Grants: Covers the costs of traveling to the library to conduct research using their collections.
Formby Research Fellowship: For research at Texas Tech’s special collections.
Truman-Kauffman Fellowship: For use of archival materials at the Truman library.
David Woodward Fellowship: For those interested in cartography; allows fellows to set up and curate a show or to research collections.
Verney Fellowship: For those researching Nantucket history.
Mark Samuels Lasner Fellowship: For researchers focused on printing history.

Dissertation and Early Career Funding
McNeil Center Dissertation Fellowship: For those studying early American history.
CLIR Mellon Fellowships: For dissertation research using original sources.
Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship: For those studying religion or ethics.
AABS Dissertation Fellowship: For those focused on Baltic studies.
Peter Rollins Travel Grant: For early career faculty travel to Popular Culture Association conference.
Bosanquet Bursary (UK): short-term residency in London for history or literature research.
Hench Post-Dissertation Fellowship: Offered through the American Antiquarian Society.

Other Funding Sources
EPA Graduate Fellowships: For those studying environmental science; includes one for Information Science.
Morningstar Public Librarian Support Award: To attend ALA Annual; for those engaged in business reference.
Collaborative Doctoral Awards (UK): Allows for research and work collaboration between academic and business.
Japanese Language Education Overseas (Japan): Opportunities to teach Japanese.
North Carolina Artists’ Fellowship: Helps creative development of artists and gives time to pursue work.
Getty Institute Grants and Fellowships: Short term fellowships, pre- and post-doctoral opportunities available.
Academy Professors: Academy of Finland recruiting full-time researchers who are considered prominent in their field.
Schoenecke Travel Grant: For graduate students to attend the Popular Culture Association conference.

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>The Next Phase of Library History Research

>For those who read my blog posts a few months ago, you might remember this post where I celebrated the completion of my manuscript on Iowa libraries during World War I. Recently, I heard from a publisher I sent a proposal and sample chapter to, and they made some great suggestions for improvements that they wanted to see before the manuscript was sent through peer review. I wanted to share some thoughts here, but more importantly I wanted to solicit some input from folks who have read my research (or listened to me talk about it). I want my manuscript to be as awesome as possible, and I bet there are some great suggestions out there!

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>The Library of Tomorrow…Yesterday!

I ran across this rather lengthy quote while adding to my chapter on libraries from 1914-1916, and was so pleased by it I couldn’t wait to share it with you! It’s from the 1914 annual report, written by Iowa City Public Library’s librarian, Helen McRaith. Unfortunately my Internet was down yesterday (and most of today), so I had to contain my excitement until now:

“The modern idea of the function of a library is this—to study the literary needs of its own community and then to endeavor to meet these needs to the fullest extent, even if tradition must be violated in so doing.
The old-fashioned library was a cloistral place appealing only to the scholar, who moved silently among dust-covered tomes. The modern library possesses a different atmosphere and one more akin to that of a business office; most of the readers have the appearance of seeking information which will be of assistance in their daily problems rather than abstract knowledge.
There is a similar change in the appearance and attitude of the librarians. Formerly they seemed to look on the library as an end in itself and as a collection of interesting curiosities, they were willing to let it remain a stagnant literary pool. Now they must be alert specialists, keen to keep a stream of vital, useful knowledge flowing from the library to all parts of the community.” (Iowa City Public Library 1914 annual report, pg 1).
This reminds me so much of some of the current discussion circulating around the changing field of librarianship, even though it was written almost 100 years ago. Her writing has the same tone of excitement that I feel in my own blog and in reading the posts of other LIS bloggers, about the library as a place of expanding opportunities and of librarians as being people who are redefining the field rather than just participating in it.
There are a couple places in particular where her writing sounds like it could have been lifted out of a modern blog (and then had the language antiquated a bit, of course): there is so much concern right now about justifying the value of libraries, and a lot of that justification comes through pointing out that the library is used for practical purposes, as McRaith says, “…seeking information which will be of assistance in their daily problems rather than abstract knowledge.”

>Roots and Routes: How I Came to Library & Information Science

>Today was orientation for the new cohort in our department, and it was absolutely a blast. The students are passionate and ready to work, and I felt fortunate to spend the day getting to know some of them. One of the presentations by LISSO (Library and Information Student Organization) included mention of The Library Routes Project. I’m glad I was there to learn about the project and to then go home and look at some of the posts, especially after spending a day with new students and with professionals who were discussing how they came to the field. I had read about it previously on Lauren in Libraryland, and was excited about the project. However, as happens so often, I got bogged down under other tasks and eventually slipped to the back of my mind.

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