Funding: Week of October 9th

Here’s this week’s installment of funding opportunities: as always, let me know if you can think of others I’ve missed!
I’ve found a few that I think are especially interesting to my fellow IS doctoral students but that fall in many different categories. Those are marked with an asterisk (*). There are many other great opportunities for grad students too across many disciplines, so make sure to read them all!

Travel & Research Grants for Specific Collections:
Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowships: For postdocs, independent scholars, or dissertations requiring work with Ransom Center collections.
Society of the Cincinnati: Funding to use Society collections for at least 5 days.
Winterthur: Offers several types of fellowships for those using Winterthur collections.
American Antiquarian Society: Short-term research fellowships

International Opportunities:
International Research Linkages (Canada): For those engaged in study of Canada to foster international collaboration.
Graduate Student Scholarships (Canada): For students writing a thesis or dissertation on Canadian studies to access resources in Canada.
Digital Transformations Research Development Funding (UK): For those studying digital transformations in the arts and humanities.
Early Career Fellowship (Greece): Through the British School in Athens, non-stipendiary fellowship for conducting research on Greece.
Canada Asia-Pacific Awards (Canada): For researchers studying the relationship between Canada and the Asia-Pacific Region.
*Institute for Culture and Society (Australia): Graduate student funding for University of Western Sydney.
Center for Arabic Studies Abroad (Egypt and Syria): Fellowship for a student to go overseas to study language and culture for one year.

Internships/Scholarships/Dissertation Grants:
Udall Internships: For Native American undergraduate and graduate students.
Kappa Omicron Nu: Masters and Doctoral-level scholarships.
Graduate Internships: Through the Getty Foundation for those working with visual arts, including information management, curating, and conservation.
Library Internships: Through Society of the Cincinnati.
*Josephine de Karmen fellowships: For those writing dissertations in all disciplines; international students are eligible.

Social Science/Technology/LIS:
Randy Gerson Memorial Grant: For graduate students studying family/couple dynamics or multi-generational processes.
*Tomash Fellowship in the History of Information Technology: For dissertation research on the history of computing.
Maryland Library Association Awards: Given for a variety of achievements.
*AT&T Labs Internships and Fellowships: For women and minorities in computing and communications.

Arts and Humanities:
The Celebration Foundation: Awards for Oregon-based artists and organizations.
John Leyerle-CARA Prize for Dissertation Research: For Medieval Studies.
Quadrant: Program giving fellows in arts and humanities the opportunity to network and research with other fields.
Excellence in West Texas history: Fellowship for those using regional archives.
*Kenyon Fellowship: For dissertation research by members of underrepresented groups seeking a career in research and teaching.

Funding Opportunities-Week of September 25

It’s time for my third installment of this funding opportunities post. Last week’s post was updated a couple times during the week, and I hope to keep doing that each week as more information about funding trickles in. I’ve decided to try something different this week and divide things up by discipline (where applicable.) Some of the awards are across disciplines, so those I’m still going to categorize by professional position. I’d like input on how it’s most helpful to lay these things out, so if you have ideas please share! Happy hunting!

Library and Information Studies:
Melvil Dewey Medal: An award for leadership in LIS in the areas Dewey was most interested in.
Beatrice E. Griggs scholarship: For an MLS student pursuing a school library media certificate.
Zora Neale Hurston Award: For those who help promote African-American literature and serve diverse populations.
Charlie Robinson Award: Given to a public library director who, over a 7 year period, has taken risks and been an innovator.
Louis Shores award: For excellence in reviewing books and other media.
Baker & Taylor/YALSA Conference Grants: For first-time conference attendance for those who work directly with young adults.
Isadora Gilbert Mudge award: For distinguished contributions to reference librarianship.
Ken Haycock Award: For promoting appreciation of the field of librarianship.
Genealogical Publishing Company Award: For librarians who have worked to improve genealogical services.
Miriam Dudley Instruction Librarian Award: For someone who has made a significant contribution to instruction in a college/research library.
Routledge Distance Learning Librarianship Award: For those working in distance learning; helps cover costs to attend ALA Annual conference.
Paul Howard Award for Courage: For an LIS professional who displays great courage to further the interests of their institution or field.

Political Science:
CSDP Visiting Scholars: For a fellowship at the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics.

History/American Studies:
The Roosevelt Institute: Includes a list of awards, including grants-in-aid for those studying the Roosevelt years.
Anschutz Fellowship: For someone within or outside of academia to teach American Studies an participate in life at Princeton.
Venetian Research Program publication assistance: For those who have had a work accepted for publication on the subject of Venetian history and culture.
American School of Classical Studies at Athens: Funding opportunities for those studying Classics, History, and Greek Law to conduct research in Athens.
World War One Digital Content Prioritization (UK): In advance of the 100th anniversary of the conflict, this is for professionals and organizations involved in preserving WWI history in digital form.
Leo Baeck Institute DAAD Fellowship: To study the history and culture of German-speaking Jews.

Science and Technology:
ITEEA Academy of Fellows: For the International Technology and Engineering Educators Association.
F-Paris Computer Services Contract (France): Call for proposals to develop training in computer services.
Lancaster University Marie Curie Fellowships: For health services-related interfaces.

Internships/Fellowships:
JASWDC Internships: For Japan-America Society of Washington, D.C.
Postdoctoral Fellowships for Faculty Diversity: Offered through several partner schools.
The Society of the Cincinnati: Fellowships and internships for the library and museum.
Barra PostDoctoral Fellowship: For early (pre-1850) American studies. Includes stipend, insurance, and office space. Deadline November 1st.

>Guest Post at Banana Suit Librarian!

>My awesome friend and colleague, Rachel, might be known to some of you as Librarian in a Banana Suit. She’s been a huge inspiration to me as someone who fights for information access and civil liberties (and was one of the founders of B Sides Journal!) I feel honored that she asked me to be the first guest blogger on her blog (which you should check out regularly, if you haven’t been already). Go to the link below to check it out!
Crowdsourcing and Collaboration: 20th Century Style!

>Another article on Scribd

>Second time this week!

I posted my article: “Learning from the Past: Digitization and Information Loss” on Scribd where you can read it for free using this link. It was originally published in B Sides this last May, but since B Sides is awesome and lets authors keep control of rights over their work, I can distribute it as I wish! To see the article on the B Sides site, go here.
“Learning from the Past” is an article that provides an overview of digitization issues and current solutions to information loss for those who are somewhat new to the subject.
As always, let me know if you have any questions or noticed anything in the article that piqued your interest!
March 2011 update: Somehow, Scribd lost my account, so these are no longer available.

>The Library of Tomorrow…Yesterday!

I ran across this rather lengthy quote while adding to my chapter on libraries from 1914-1916, and was so pleased by it I couldn’t wait to share it with you! It’s from the 1914 annual report, written by Iowa City Public Library’s librarian, Helen McRaith. Unfortunately my Internet was down yesterday (and most of today), so I had to contain my excitement until now:

“The modern idea of the function of a library is this—to study the literary needs of its own community and then to endeavor to meet these needs to the fullest extent, even if tradition must be violated in so doing.
The old-fashioned library was a cloistral place appealing only to the scholar, who moved silently among dust-covered tomes. The modern library possesses a different atmosphere and one more akin to that of a business office; most of the readers have the appearance of seeking information which will be of assistance in their daily problems rather than abstract knowledge.
There is a similar change in the appearance and attitude of the librarians. Formerly they seemed to look on the library as an end in itself and as a collection of interesting curiosities, they were willing to let it remain a stagnant literary pool. Now they must be alert specialists, keen to keep a stream of vital, useful knowledge flowing from the library to all parts of the community.” (Iowa City Public Library 1914 annual report, pg 1).
This reminds me so much of some of the current discussion circulating around the changing field of librarianship, even though it was written almost 100 years ago. Her writing has the same tone of excitement that I feel in my own blog and in reading the posts of other LIS bloggers, about the library as a place of expanding opportunities and of librarians as being people who are redefining the field rather than just participating in it.
There are a couple places in particular where her writing sounds like it could have been lifted out of a modern blog (and then had the language antiquated a bit, of course): there is so much concern right now about justifying the value of libraries, and a lot of that justification comes through pointing out that the library is used for practical purposes, as McRaith says, “…seeking information which will be of assistance in their daily problems rather than abstract knowledge.”

>Map of Censorship in Iowa Libraries during 1918

>I know I’ve mentioned this before, but there is a wonderful Google map that shows all the book bans and challenges in the U.S. over the last 3 years.  When I ran across this map a while back, it gave me the idea to do a similar thing with the Herbert Metcalf letters that inspired my WWI Iowa libraries project. (Metcalf was the man to whom librarians around the state sent letters indicating that they had removed items from their shelves in response to his request).
I made the map and used it for a class presentation, and just recently dug it back up while I was poking around Google. For those who are interested in Iowa or World War I history, this might be of interest to you. You can find my map at this link.

Continue reading “>Map of Censorship in Iowa Libraries during 1918”

>Free Resources for Students and Researchers

>There are a ton of great free resources out there both for students and for researchers, and I wanted to share some that I’ve found before the semester kicks into high gear. I know I’ve mentioned some of these resources before, but I’ve come across so many more that it’s good to keep the list updated. If you know of anything that I missed, please include it–I’d love to make as complete a list as possible!

Continue reading “>Free Resources for Students and Researchers”