Funding: Week Of October 2nd

Another installment in this series of funding opportunities! I’ve organized them by field and tacked miscellaneous ones at the end. There are a lot of great funding opportunities I’ve found this week and, as always, if you know of one I didn’t include make sure to add it!

Library & Information Science/Museum Studies:
National Museum of the American Indian: 10 week internships.
Volunteer Internships and Research Assistantships (unpaid): National Gallery of Art
Gerd Muehsam Award: For graduate student papers/projects on art librarianship
YALSA/Frances Henne/VOYA  Grant: For small scale projects that promote research that responds to YALSA’s research agenda.

Art and Art History:
Wolfsonian Fellowships: For those with a Master’s or PhD who wish to study visual art & material culture, particularly from the Netherlands.
Yaddo Fellowships: For artists’ residency in Yaddo community. Deadline January 1st.
Infuse: For building collaborations in the arts in Australia.
Visiting Scholars: at the Yale Center for British Art; predoctoral and postdoc opportunities available

History:
Twentieth Century Japan Research Award: For those researching recent Japanese history.
John W. Hartman Center: Travel grants for using the collection of sales, marketing, and advertising history items.
Center for Jewish History: Fellowships
University of Kansas Medical Center: Fellowship for study of medical history.
Predoctoral Residencies: For those in Byzantine, pre-Columbian, or Garden and Landscape Studies
International Committee for the History of Technology: prize for a book or dissertation. Also have an article prize.
Marshall Foundation: Awards for 20th century military and diplomatic history.
Research Society for Victorian Periodicals: Curran Fellowship for research; also a book prize
American Antiquarian Society: short-term fellowships
Humanities and Social Sciences:
Newberry Library Short-Term Fellowships in the Humanities: Mostly for PhD candidates and post-doctoral scholars.
John Carter Brown Library Short-Term Fellowships: For a variety of research topics that utilize the library’s collections.
American Research Institute in Turkey: For those wishing to conduct Humanities and Social Science research in Turkey.
Summer Institute for Israel Studies: For faculty designing courses on Israel studies.
Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Program: Fellowships for humanities and social sciences–this year’s theme is “Media: Cuneiform to Digital and Beyond”
Associate Fellowship (non-stipendiary): University of Victoria Centre for Studies in Religion and Society
Artz Summer Program: For use of Oberlin’s special collections

Women’s/Gender Studies:
Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies: Visiting faculty opportunities

Publication Awards and Miscellaneous Other Awards:
Working Class Studies Association: Awards for publications and dissertations.
Hagley Prize: For a book on business history.
Samsung Ho-Am Prize: For achievement in science, engineering, medicine, arts, and community service; for people of Korean descent.
Hispanic Scholarship Fund: For graduate and undergraduate students
Five Colleges Fellowship: For students from underrepresented groups who are working on their dissertations.
American Association of University Women: Career development grants

Teaching Awards:
Bernath Lecture Prize: For exceptional teaching of foreign relations.
Jose Vasconcelos Award: For educators.

 

Book Review: Critical Library Instruction

Maria Accardi, Emily Drabinski, and Alana Kumbier. Critical Library Instruction: Theories and Methods, 2009, Library Juice Press: Duluth, MN.

Visit the publisher’s website here: http://libraryjuicepress.com/

I got a review copy of this book a while back (thank you, Rory Litwin!) and have been reading this book in spurts for the last month. It doesn’t normally take me that long to read a book, but I found myself spending so much time highlighting and making notes in the book that it took me several hours to read each chapter (also, graduation and such has made life busy.) I requested a copy hoping to review it from the perspective of someone who is about to begin instructing students, and during the time I read the book I was impressed by how much I could translate the findings from the book into the classroom, and how much positive feedback I heard about the book when I mentioned that I was reviewing it.

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Publishing in LIS: Marrying Theory and Practice

Today B Sides Journal hosted a lunchtime presentation by Dr. Jim Elmborg about publishing for LIS students. Jim is incredibly insightful and deeply passionate about the success of his students, which meant that we walked away with some great perspective on publication in our field. I wanted to share my notes from the talk so other students and professionals can benefit from his ideas! The talk was incredible, and I am going to focus on a few of the big take-aways that will help me as I continue to publish and encourage LIS students to do the same.

1. Examine your motives: *Why* is it that you want to publish? Are you just doing it because you’re required to or want a line on your resume, or are you doing it because you love to investigate problems and share ideas? It’s important to check your motives to make sure that it’s something you genuinely want to do (as Jim said, you don’t want to be in a place where you’re required to publish but don’t have a desire to.) Once you’ve decided you want to write this research, start looking at ways to build up your writing habits. Jim draws from fiction writing tools that I plan to draw on as I continue writing. First, never quit writing for the day without knowing what your next paragraph will be. When you start writing next, it will be much easier because you already have a clear direction and know what you need to do next. Also, look at the iceberg metaphor (what you’re writing is only a part of the knowledge that you have that’s informing your perspective.) The more you write, the more you’ll feel frustrated (or at least I do) by not having a chance to put in every piece of information you know. For most things you write, no one will want to read a 5-10 page lit review, a detailed description of every theory that you’re drawing from, or an agonizingly long and tedious breakdown of your library’s usage statistics. These things have their place (enter, footnotes) but you are going to have a lot more going on than will fit nicely in the paper. If you find that your paper represents your exhaustive knowledge of the topic, it’s time to go back and look at it further.
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>Some Exciting History-Themed Resources

>While the purpose of this blog is primarily to focus on librarianship, the joys of being an LIS student, and my own research, I feel like there is so much of an overlap between my own work and other fields that sometimes I want to be a little more interdisciplinary! Lately, I’ve been shown a lot of really exciting online resources that might technically fall under ‘history resources,’ but that creative minds could apply to an LIS classroom (and of course, to history classes as well.) So, for both students and instructors, I present a brief list to you:

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>Tips and Tricks from Library School

>Lauren Dodd recently posted The Dos and Don’ts of Library School on her blog, and it got me to thinking what advice I would give to people entering a Master’s program. I would definitely recommend reading her post: it has some great suggestions, all of which I agree with! I thought of a couple other things that I would suggest as well, and so I am adding them here.

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