Funding Opportunities, Week of November 7th

Mathematics and Natural Sciences
Rocky Mountain Fellowships: To conduct research in the Rocky Mountains.
Georgia Ornithological Society: Graduate student grants.
Albert Schweitzer Fellowship: Fellowship in health-related community service and leadership.
Foundation of the American Society of Neuroradiology: Women in Neuroradiology Leadership Award.
Schultes Research Award: Society for Economic Botany.
Clay Mathematics Institute: Research Fellowships.

International Opportunities
Frank Knox Memorial Scholarships: For students from the UK to study at Harvard.
Butterfield Scholarships: For Bermudian students to study abroad.
Humanities Awards: British School at Rome.
Dunlop Asia Fellowships: For Australian students working to improve Australia-Asian relations.
Harrell Family Fellowship: For students to conduct archaeological research in Jordan.
IFK Fellowships: For Austrian students.
American Institute of Iranian Studies: Language training and fellowships.
Post-Doctoral Fellowships: Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto.
Albright Fellowships: A variety of awards available for study in the Middle East. Includes awards for scholars from a variety of countries.
Bikai Fellowship: For archaeological research in Jordan. Open to graduate students of any nationality except Jordanian.
Gen Foundation Grants: In arts and sciences.
University of Cambridge grants and awards: For Scandinavian studies.
Alberta Innovates Graduate Scholarship: For Canadian students.
Modern Greek Language Scholarships: For international applicants to study in Greece.
American Institute of Pakistan Studies: Fellowships.
Scholarships: For Master’s students studying Finland or Finnish.
King Scholarship: For Canadian students.
Inlaks Grant: For Indian students to travel abroad for research.

Library & Information Studies, Museum Studies, Archives
Pinkett Minority Student Award: Society of American Archivists
Holmes Travel Award: For international archivists to attend the SAA annual meeting.
Fellowships: At the Lemelson Center (also for researchers outside LIS).

History
Loring Research Fellowship: For Civil War-related research.
Mining History Association: Limited travel funds for upcoming conference (deadline is 11/15), also publication awards.
Philadelphia Area Center for the History of Science: Fellowships.
Schmitt Research Grants: European, African, or Asian history.
Walpole Fellowships: To study in Yale’s Walpole library.
Postdoctoral Fellowships: For work at UCLA.
Virginia Historical Society: Research fellowships.
Michigan Tech Travel Grants: To use the archives for research.

Education
Thought and Excellence in the Academy Awards: For those teaching in higher education.
2012 Korea Fellowship for American Educators: Open to educators at all levels.

Social Science
Jerome Hall Postdoctoral Fellowship: In law, society, and culture.
Mathematical Sociology: Publication, graduate student paper, and dissertation-in-progress awards.

Other Opportunities
The Kosciuszko Foundation: Scholarships for American students of Polish descent.

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Funding Opportunities, Week of October 16th

Many of the opportunities I’ve come across this week are interdisciplinary, so I have lumped them into broader categories than I might usually. As always, add any to the list that I’ve overlooked!

Library Science, Museum Studies, and Book Studies
The Bibliographical Society: A number of fellowships and bursaries are available for varies interest areas.
Internships: At the Smithsonian; covers a broad range of activities.
Museum Studies Internship: Philadelphia Museum of Art (unpaid).
Collections Intern (unpaid): International Center for Photography.
Summer Internships: National Gallery of Art.
Visiting Fellowship in Law Librarianship: University of London Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.
Jan Merrill-Oldham Professional Development Grant: For students and new professionals interested in preservation.

Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences:
Botstiber Felowship: Grants for work that explores relationship between US and Austria.
Bertha Klausner Research Fellowship: For travel to American Heritage Center.
Clements Center for Southwest Studies: Provides support for new scholars writing books.
Clayman Institute for Gender Studies: Research fellowships.
W.R. Poage Legislative Library: Research grants to use the archives.
Tanner Humanities Center: Fellowships for humanistic research in a variety of fields. Middle East studies and the study of women writers are particularly welcome.
Naropa University: Visiting fellowships for scholars, activists, artists, and others studying Buddhism.
Post Graduate Fellowships in Islamic Art and Culture: At the Bard Graduate Center, NYC.
Fellowships in American Art: At the Smithsonian.
Long Term Fellowships in the Humanities: At the Newberry Library.
Research Fellowships: At the John Carter Brown Library; for Colonial American studies.
Visiting Research Scholars: NYU Institute for the Study of the Ancient World.
UIUC Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellowship: In African American Studies.
Janet Arnold Award: Society of Antiquaries of London; for those researching Western dress.
Bolin Dissertation and Post-MFA Fellowships: For members of underrepresented groups.
Political Science Funding: Through the NSF.
Wills Research Fellowship: Tennessee Historical Society.
Mellon Pre-doctoral Fellowship: Cold War/Post-1945 History.
Neiman Fellowships: For arts and culture journalism.
I Tatti Fellowship: For work on the Italian Renaissance.
Fellows Program: At the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies.
John M. Carey Fellowship: For researching Wyoming and Western history.
Visiting Scholars Program: Institute for Research on Poverty.
Mellon PostDoc Teaching Fellowship: In Penn School of Arts and Sciences.
Research Fellowships and Grants: American Statistical Association.
Funded Fellowships: Through the American Research Center in Egypt.
Woodress Visiting Fellowships: At the Willa Cather Archive.
Postdoctoral Fellowships in East Asian Studies: Johns Hopkins University.
Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants: National Science Foundation.
Philip Jones Fellowship: Ephemera Society of America.
Lewis Walpole Fellowship and Travel Grants: For those wishing to do research at the Walpole library.
Hoover Library Travel Grant: For conducting research at the Hoover presidential library in Iowa.
Terra Foundation for American Art: Scholarships and Grants
Drugs, Security and Democracy Program: For researchers who are PhD candidates or recent PhD recipients.
Research Fellowships: John Carter Brown library.

Teaching Awards
Mellon PostDoc Teaching Fellowship: In Penn School of Arts and Sciences.
Princeton Center for Human Values: Teaching fellowships, graduate student prizes, and more.

Visual Arts
SlowArts: For emerging artists, prizes and publication for select artists.
William Flanagan Creative Persons Center: Summer Fellowships for Artists.

International Opportunities:
Sidney Sussex Research Fellowships: For three years from September 1, 2012. One for arts and social sciences, one for “hard” sciences.
Rowntree Charitable Trust: For those studying the conflict in Northern Ireland.
Palestine Exploration Fund : For study of biblical Palestine and the Levant.
Visiting Fellowships: School of Advanced Study, University of London.
Centenary Bursaries: Through the British School at Athens.
Fellowship Programme: University of London Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.
Anthropology Field School: In Malta. Submit research concepts (can be unrelated to Malta) for consideration.
UNESCO/Japan Young Researchers Fellowships: For researchers from developing countries.

Funding Opportunities-Week of September 25

It’s time for my third installment of this funding opportunities post. Last week’s post was updated a couple times during the week, and I hope to keep doing that each week as more information about funding trickles in. I’ve decided to try something different this week and divide things up by discipline (where applicable.) Some of the awards are across disciplines, so those I’m still going to categorize by professional position. I’d like input on how it’s most helpful to lay these things out, so if you have ideas please share! Happy hunting!

Library and Information Studies:
Melvil Dewey Medal: An award for leadership in LIS in the areas Dewey was most interested in.
Beatrice E. Griggs scholarship: For an MLS student pursuing a school library media certificate.
Zora Neale Hurston Award: For those who help promote African-American literature and serve diverse populations.
Charlie Robinson Award: Given to a public library director who, over a 7 year period, has taken risks and been an innovator.
Louis Shores award: For excellence in reviewing books and other media.
Baker & Taylor/YALSA Conference Grants: For first-time conference attendance for those who work directly with young adults.
Isadora Gilbert Mudge award: For distinguished contributions to reference librarianship.
Ken Haycock Award: For promoting appreciation of the field of librarianship.
Genealogical Publishing Company Award: For librarians who have worked to improve genealogical services.
Miriam Dudley Instruction Librarian Award: For someone who has made a significant contribution to instruction in a college/research library.
Routledge Distance Learning Librarianship Award: For those working in distance learning; helps cover costs to attend ALA Annual conference.
Paul Howard Award for Courage: For an LIS professional who displays great courage to further the interests of their institution or field.

Political Science:
CSDP Visiting Scholars: For a fellowship at the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics.

History/American Studies:
The Roosevelt Institute: Includes a list of awards, including grants-in-aid for those studying the Roosevelt years.
Anschutz Fellowship: For someone within or outside of academia to teach American Studies an participate in life at Princeton.
Venetian Research Program publication assistance: For those who have had a work accepted for publication on the subject of Venetian history and culture.
American School of Classical Studies at Athens: Funding opportunities for those studying Classics, History, and Greek Law to conduct research in Athens.
World War One Digital Content Prioritization (UK): In advance of the 100th anniversary of the conflict, this is for professionals and organizations involved in preserving WWI history in digital form.
Leo Baeck Institute DAAD Fellowship: To study the history and culture of German-speaking Jews.

Science and Technology:
ITEEA Academy of Fellows: For the International Technology and Engineering Educators Association.
F-Paris Computer Services Contract (France): Call for proposals to develop training in computer services.
Lancaster University Marie Curie Fellowships: For health services-related interfaces.

Internships/Fellowships:
JASWDC Internships: For Japan-America Society of Washington, D.C.
Postdoctoral Fellowships for Faculty Diversity: Offered through several partner schools.
The Society of the Cincinnati: Fellowships and internships for the library and museum.
Barra PostDoctoral Fellowship: For early (pre-1850) American studies. Includes stipend, insurance, and office space. Deadline November 1st.

Book Review: Critical Library Instruction

Maria Accardi, Emily Drabinski, and Alana Kumbier. Critical Library Instruction: Theories and Methods, 2009, Library Juice Press: Duluth, MN.

Visit the publisher’s website here: http://libraryjuicepress.com/

I got a review copy of this book a while back (thank you, Rory Litwin!) and have been reading this book in spurts for the last month. It doesn’t normally take me that long to read a book, but I found myself spending so much time highlighting and making notes in the book that it took me several hours to read each chapter (also, graduation and such has made life busy.) I requested a copy hoping to review it from the perspective of someone who is about to begin instructing students, and during the time I read the book I was impressed by how much I could translate the findings from the book into the classroom, and how much positive feedback I heard about the book when I mentioned that I was reviewing it.

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Publishing in LIS: Marrying Theory and Practice

Today B Sides Journal hosted a lunchtime presentation by Dr. Jim Elmborg about publishing for LIS students. Jim is incredibly insightful and deeply passionate about the success of his students, which meant that we walked away with some great perspective on publication in our field. I wanted to share my notes from the talk so other students and professionals can benefit from his ideas! The talk was incredible, and I am going to focus on a few of the big take-aways that will help me as I continue to publish and encourage LIS students to do the same.

1. Examine your motives: *Why* is it that you want to publish? Are you just doing it because you’re required to or want a line on your resume, or are you doing it because you love to investigate problems and share ideas? It’s important to check your motives to make sure that it’s something you genuinely want to do (as Jim said, you don’t want to be in a place where you’re required to publish but don’t have a desire to.) Once you’ve decided you want to write this research, start looking at ways to build up your writing habits. Jim draws from fiction writing tools that I plan to draw on as I continue writing. First, never quit writing for the day without knowing what your next paragraph will be. When you start writing next, it will be much easier because you already have a clear direction and know what you need to do next. Also, look at the iceberg metaphor (what you’re writing is only a part of the knowledge that you have that’s informing your perspective.) The more you write, the more you’ll feel frustrated (or at least I do) by not having a chance to put in every piece of information you know. For most things you write, no one will want to read a 5-10 page lit review, a detailed description of every theory that you’re drawing from, or an agonizingly long and tedious breakdown of your library’s usage statistics. These things have their place (enter, footnotes) but you are going to have a lot more going on than will fit nicely in the paper. If you find that your paper represents your exhaustive knowledge of the topic, it’s time to go back and look at it further.
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LIS education, Advocacy, and the Future of Librarianship

A lot of discussion has been circulating about the future of librarianship in response to comments made by Jeffrey Trzeciak (of McMaster University) indicating that he wouldn’t hire any more librarians, preferring instead to give certain positions to people in IT or with PhDs. I agree that in many instances you might want to consider candidates from a variety of backgrounds, but to discount librarians (especially coming from the University Librarian himself!) is an indication of how deeply our field is misunderstood. I first read about it through Jenica Rogers’ post, which I think provides a great intro to the subject and some awesome perspective on why we need advocacy as professionals (not just as a profession or as institutions.) My fellow Hack Library School editors, along with Courtney Walters and a few others, began discussing the topic via Twitter (I was at work, so didn’t get to jump in until after the fact!) If you’re interested in seeing the discussion, look for #savelibrarians. In addition, some blog posts have started going up to discuss our future as professionals–a great post in particular is Courtney Walter’s discussion of our identity crisis as librarians/info pros.

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>Rehashing #unpackLIS

>Friday was “Unpacking the ‘Library’: Exploring Works in Progress Across the Field of LIS.” This conference was significant for me not only because I had a blast as an audience member, but because it was the first conference I have helped to plan and run. Our goal with the conference was to use it as an extension of B Sides Journal‘s dual mission of professional development and education, and it was a resounding success! I’m planning on writing another post on the process of planning a student-run conference, but for this one I wanted to focus on sharing some of the takeaways from all of the awesome presentations!

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