Tag Archives: art

Art updates

Recently I set a goal to work towards gallery representation for my art (if I say it publicly, then I’m committed to doing the work, right?) and one of my first steps in that is to update my art page with some more recent (and organized!) samples, plus create a publicly-accessible artist’s CV.  I am still in the early stages of my two current projects (Magic/k and Southern Wilds, which doesn’t have any completed pieces yet), so the boundaries around what those are and how I describe them will evolve as time goes on. I’ll also be adding more images to my portfolio soon as I get everything photographed, so check back regularly for updates!

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Dark Arts Gallery

I was asked to include my work in an online-only exhibition–which is my first show done in a digital, rather than physical, space. There are some other great pieces in there, and the gallery owners are encouraging visitors to vote for their favorites. You can check out the gallery here!

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Handy Books Exhibition

If you’re at the Center for the Book in Iowa this fall, make sure to check out the Handy Books exhibition, including this upcoming symposium and opening reception. I’m really excited to be a part of this exhibition, because it uses historic examples as the basis for artists’ responses (BUT those responses have to consider movable components of the book beyond the usual function of a codex). I created a piece that moves well beyond the codex form, using three egg shapes with movable components to tell a story (you can see a video of it in action here).

I used two examples from the Bentley Museum’s collection: A dissolving picture book, and a fragment of a microfiche Lunar Bible housed in a Faberge egg. The good folks at UICB posted a few photos as teasers before the opening, and I am *so excited* to see all the great works that my piece was put in conversation with. As always, they have done an amazing job, and I can’t wait to see the rest of the exhibit once it opens!

 

 

One last note: I’m especially happy about this exhibit because it’s one of four (!) I’ve been in so far this year (if you know me IRL you know that I historically was pretty shy about sharing my art, so that’s a big deal). I don’t see that train stopping, so expect to see more of my art in public spaces moving forward!

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Interview with Library as Incubator Project

A few days ago, the Library as Incubator Project posted an interview they did with me about earlier this month. I had a lot of fun doing the interview, and it also got me to think through how my art informs my practice as a librarian (and vice versa). Check it out!

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Some Quick Thoughts on iConference 2014

Now that I’m back in the states and have had a bit of time to settle in, I wanted to jot down some of the stuff that stood out to me during my time at the iConference.

Standing next to our poster. Photo credit to my co-presenter, Gary Burnett

Standing next to our poster. Photo credit to my co-presenter, Gary Burnett

Creativity and Arts-Based Work

As academics, we (myself included) often get stuck in the accepted modes of production and thinking in order to produce work that is taken seriously by our colleagues and that hopefully helps us advance in our careers. There is obviously a lot of value in the work that we do and the rigorous approaches we employ, but I’m happy to see the same rigor and critical thinking being encouraged in arts-based work that acknowledges the value of play, creativity, and multiple approaches to engagement with a topic. This is something I’ve seen and talked about with folks at ASIST, ALISE, and the iConference this year, and I’m looking forward to seeing more arts-based work being shared in our field. I’m also very interested in pursuing this kind of work and open to conversations and research collaborations for those also doing this kind of work!

At the iConference in particular, I was very excited to see a conference stream centered on creativity (organized by the inspirational Dr. Theresa Anderson). This included the Researchers as Makers conference workshop I was a part of (we made zines!) as well as the iPause space, which encouraged attendees to take a break from the usual conference activities to pause and play. That space offered a much-needed break, and made it ok to engage in play or to sit quietly and reflect. As a supporter of creative play and of having a healthy balance of work and play, this space really spoke to me. I was very pleased that the iConference is open to this kind of engagement, and it definitely makes me more likely to want to attend more conferences in the future!

Social Media

At both poster sessions, there were some amazing social media projects being shared. One of my favorites was a poster on political tweets by the students at the i3 iSchool Inclusion Institute, who were all undergrads  but who blew a lot of their more experienced colleagues out of the water with their work. There were many, many other amazing projects too, and as always I learned so much from everyone I talked to at the conference. I also learned a lot sharing my poster too (which is my favorite part of presenting). I was anticipating more questions about the theory we used, but we ended up getting a lot of questions about how we defined the contexts surrounding the groups we studied. I also enjoyed having the chance to talk about US political movements to an international audience–here, most people know the role of the Tea Party and Occupy movements within our political discourse, but it was fun to get to articulate those roles for people who operate in a variety of political structures.

There are so many things I learned, and so many wonderful people I got to meet, but those two themes were ones that I really wanted to talk about (and they are themes that I’ve noticed at other recent conferences too). The iConference left me energized, encouraged, and inspired, and I hope to attend again next year!

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The Spring Semester

A quick note to throw some ideas out there for this semester as we’re all settling into our schedules:

I passed my prelims (hooray!) and am starting on my prospectus. Years ago, myself and a few other folks used the #teamachieve hashtag on Twitter to motivate each other as we shared our daily word counts. I want to ask those folks to get involved again, but I think it would be cool to have as a bigger endeavor too. So if you want in, let me know (or just start tweeting!)

I’m going to the iConference in Berlin this March. I had an absolutely amazing time with my colleagues at ALISE, and I wanted to see if anyone will be at the iConference and is interested in going for a meal or beverage with me! 

I’m really wanting to do some arts-based research lately, but need some inspiration. Does anyone want to do a Google Hangout or Facebook group or something and bounce ideas off each other? 

Happy Spring semester!!

 

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New Funding Opportunities

It has been a long, long time since I’ve gotten the chance to post these (sorry everyone!) I’ve run across some good stuff this week though, so I thought I would share them. Since the international opportunities are across many disciplines, I’ve decided I’m going to start organizing those items by field rather than lumping them all together, but other than that these are organized the same as my earlier posts. Enjoy!

Arts
The Women’s Initiative: For a photojournalistic project dealing with violence against women.
Artist Enrichment funding: Through the Kentucky Foundation for Women.
Berlin Prize in Music Composition: American Academy in Berlin.
Manhattan Community Arts Fund: For arts projects serving the lower Manhattan area.
Young People and the Arts: To support professional development (Australia).

Humanities and Social Sciences
Marshall/Baruch Fellowship: For those studying U.S. military or diplomatic history.
University College Cork: Accepting applications for a PhD in digital arts and humanities (Ireland).

Library & Information Science
 
AAHSL Leadership Program: For those seeking leadership positions in health sciences librarianship.

Sciences
Theodore Dunham, Jr. Grants: For research in Astronomy.
Stony Wold-Herbert Fund: For people in the New York City area researching pulmonary disease.

Other Opportunities
The Bicentennial Swedish-American Exchange Fund: To allow a working visit to Sweden.
North Carolina Scholarship: Through the Swedish Women’s Educational Association.
Mott Foundation: Funding for projects related to civil society, the environment, Flint, MI, and to the elimination of poverty.

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