Fermentation, afternoon tea, and other February notes

I’m a bit radio silent because I’m starting a food history business (more info on that TBA!) and finishing my book manuscript for Rowman & Littlefield’s Food Culture and History series (more info on that TBA too! I have some great ideas for afternoon tea-related events and so many things to share with all of you).

I also have a few other exciting announcements (beyond starting a business and publishing a book which, I know, are already pretty big announcements):

  • Fermentation residency: I’ve been accepted to be a part of this amazing workshop, fermenting food and learning to build outdoor ovens (so I can then build my own in my yard and make all the baked goods). The workshop ends on my birthday, and I can’t think of a better way to spend it! This is especially exciting since the food history business I’m starting will (eventually) also be coupled with a nonprofit, so I can use my business to build connections between people and the past through hands-on food instruction, and bring food-making and art-making skills to parts of our community who might not normally have access to such classes. I’m very excited to learn some new skills in this workshop and to deepen my appreciation of fermented foods so I can use that to inform my work moving forward.
  • Ink making: I’ll be joining my friends from Explore Wildwood, The Homestead Atlanta, and Eventide Brewing again this month for the Wildcraft Palette Curiosity Club. I’ll be talking about ink making using natural pigments (I just finished making an ink with cloves, for example, which smells amazing!) If you’re around on 2/20, come out to Eventide and see us!
  • Common Good 10th anniversary: I am so very excited to be celebrating my colleagues at Common Good for their 10th anniversary this Sunday. They have transformed the lives of so many incarcerated scholars, and bring such a passion to their work. I count myself as very lucky to know Sarah and Bill, and am so happy to have a chance to celebrate them and all they do.

 

 

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Current food events

I have been posting more art stuff and less food stuff lately, but the food stuff is still happening. Here’s a quick run down:

-A dear friend and I have decided to conduct a study on the archaeological evidence on my property of foodways past. My yard has the remains of lots of former buildings, as well as the remains of many past pig roasts, etc., so I’m gathering and labeling bones in the bit of landscaping I’m doing, and then we’ll do a more comprehensive exploration later.

-I’m still plugging away at my next book, due to be published by Rowman and Littlefield next year. As with any research project, there are a million rabbit holes I want to go down that I just don’t have the space for–once I get a second to come up for air from writing the book I’ll get back to blogging about all the cool stuff I’m finding

-I’m bringing this 1615 wafer recipe to the holiday celebration for the prison classroom next month, which is a great opportunity to connect food history to some of the early modern lit and history they’ve been working with. Added bonus: If you click the link you can enjoy my neglected old food blog I made for my first book.

-In totally random news, I was interviewed for Mel Magazine.  I appear at the very end, but the sources I pointed to in my interview are scattered throughout. It also made an appearance in the Dollar Shave Club newsletter, so same story, two different pubs (but owned by the same folks). Enjoy!

Nothing gets an author excited like…

…a shiny new LOC name authority! My book had been listed under another Julia Skinner (who oddly enough also has written books about English food history), but the good folks at Library of Congress were very helpful and got my work disambiguated quickly.

Celebrating tonight with whatever the appropriate food/beverage combo  is for such an occasion!

A very old pie

The kind folks from FoodStuff came by recently so we could make an apple pie recipe from the 1600s and talk a bit about the history of cookbooks, recipe layout, and more (remember the Modernizing Markham project I did years ago? This recipe is from there). You can see the video on YouTube or their Facebook page, as well as link out to their full podcast on the history of apple pie.

I brought a copy of The English Housewife along to show them (before my hands were covered in flour), and it was exciting to do a food history thing to go along with my most recent hospitality industry collaborations, which have been beverage-oriented. Enjoy!